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MEETING SINGER/SONGWRITER CHAD TRAXLER


Born into a religion that suppressed musical diversity, “Trax” first fell in love with songwriting as a teenager, after (secretly) scraping together enough money to buy a guitar from a pawn shop. The genres of his songs are as diverse as his influences: layered harmonies reflect his Gospel pedigree, Latin rhythms reflect years of living abroad, and folk overtones are inspired by his Midwestern roots. A season of heartbreak (literally and metaphorically) led Trax to devote himself to music full-time. And music continues to be his salvation from depression and addiction. Trax's songs have been called "bittersweet.” His driving rhythms are reminiscent of Johnny Cash, a distant relative. His one-man-band shows, with his Headrush Loopstation as the centerpiece, reflect his reclusive personality, as does his love of solo expeditions in the wilderness of Colorado, where he now calls home. Links Listen to “Whiskey Sour” on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/1bHlkccwytpj0M5dBmugHv?si=ZJbi9eOXSMCLI_KD4-vMpw Full Lyrics for the single, “Whiskey Sour:”

“Lookin' up from the bottom of a bottle Don't know where I'm gonna sleep tomorrow Bartender keep that whiskey comin' Until I can' feel nothin' We had the best of times, the worst of times Saw a season of light in your eyes Spring of hope, winter of despair Now I know your heart wasn't really there Most times new love, will surely die Was so sure your heart was mine Bartender keep that whiskey comin' Until I can't feel nothin' Sometimes you reap, sometimes you sow Sometimes they stay, sometimes they go There's a time to hurt, a time to heal A time to run, a time to feel A time to weep, a time to laugh Even when our love is an epitaph A time for (silence), a time to sing In time there's time for everything Everything Whiskey sour, the bittersweet taste of love Tequila Sunrise, like the color in her eyes To taste the pleasure You gotta feel the pain Bartender keep that whiskey comin' Right now, time to forget her name Sometimes you reap, sometimes you sow Sometimes they stay, sometimes they go There's a time to hurt, a time to heal A time to run, a time to feel A time to weep, a time to laugh Even when our love is an epitaph A time for (silence), a time to sing In time there's time for everything Everything Whiskey sour, the bittersweet taste of love Tequila Sunrise, like the color in her eyes To taste the pleasure You gotta feel the pain Bartender keep that whiskey comin' Time to forget And start again Start again” What are your favorite lyrics from your latest single? Definitely verse 2, which were inspired by the ancient poetry of Solomon: “Sometimes you reap, sometimes you sow Sometimes they stay, sometimes they go There's a time to hurt, a time to heal A time to run, a time to feel A time to weep, a time to laugh Even when our love is an epitaph A time for (silence), a time to sing In time there's time for everything Everything” What kind of pull did you feel about making the single? The lyrics for verse 2 popped into my head while I was skiing through the trees on a really steep fall line in Colorado. I had written the tune and hook, “Whiskey Sour,” months earlier but could never find the verses. Then, while experiencing a rush of adrenaline, the ancient poetry of Solomon popped in my head (i.e. “there is a time for everything.”) That poetry is recorded in the book of Ecclesiastes, Chapter 3. So, I drew the theme for the rest of the song from Solomon’s poetry and fit it to my situation at the time: a painful breakup. Are all your writing sessions collaborative or do you go off on your own? Do you have a preference? I always write alone. I love performing in front of crowds, but I am definitely an introvert. Songwriting is a vulnerable space for me, and I guess I’m just not in a collaborative place yet. But hopefully I will be, some day. Do you ever compare the work you bring to the table? I think comparison is really unhealthy, but it’s just part of our human nature. So ya, I guess I do. I’m fairly new to songwriting; so, it was difficult for me to put my songs out there at first. But I am getting more confident. If a song meets my own personal standard, I have no problem putting it down on tape and releasing it! What is standard practice when it comes to if the song is really finished? I recently read a great quote by Jeff Tweedy, the lead songwriter for the band, Wilco: “A song is never really finished; you just leave it in an interesting place.” I love that quote! Take, for example, the song “No Woman No Cry” by Bob Marley. The live version has a much more earthy feel than the studio version, and I think the live version is the one with which most of us connect. There are thousands of examples like this – later recordings that overshadow earlier, studio versions. My live show is a one-man-band arrangement using my Headrush Loopstation. And I am always experimenting with my songs live, including the rhythms, harmonies, and guitar instrumentals. I think my songs get a little better with each show. I would love to put out a live album someday soon with the “current” (but always unfinished) versions of all my previously-released songs. What was the goal for making the latest track? We had no expectations. I recorded “Whiskey Sour” with Dylan McKinstry in his studio in Brooklyn, NY, along with my duet partner, Talia Jade, who is the cellist and backup singer on “Whiskey Sour.” Dylan, Talia, and I had so much fun that just the process of recording it was worth the time and money. Not to mention the fact that friendships developed that I hope will last a lifetime. Challenges to the new music that no one would know about? Some songs just flow out of a songwriter in a day or two. From what I’ve read, Zeppelin wrote “Stairway to Heaven” in a few hours, for example. In contrast, “Whiskey Sour” took a long time. Like I said earlier, I didn’t think that the verses would ever come to me. The chorus sat on my desk (on some scratch paper) for months. A million times, I went to toss it, but just couldn’t. I knew the hook was good. Really glad I was patient with this tune. I think it’s the best song I’ve written yet. The cool thing is that when I wrote the chorus, “Whiskey Sour,” I thought the song might be a light-hearted country song (e.g. “I Love This Bar” by Toby Keith.) However, Solomon’s poetry took the song to a really deep and profound place for me. And the first verse is an ode to another famous piece of classic literature. Can you guess which one? Favorite memory in the making of this music? I wrote “Whiskey Sour” while skiing my favorite run on my favorite mountain in all of Colorado. For a Colorado boy, what could be a better memory than that? Is there anything off the table when it comes to bringing yourselves into your music? I can’t think of anything. I’m a big believer in psychedelic therapy for depression and anxiety. I also think psychedelics might be a gateway to lyrics that break barriers. I haven’t been on a journey yet where I was in the space to write, but I think that’s going to happen. But if that does happen, I can’t wait to see where it goes! Leave us on a high note! And share some good news! I just sent my next single, “Morena Girl,” to the music distribution company. It’s gonna drop on September 9th, 2022. I spent a lot of time surfing in South America last year, and “Morena Girl” is heavily influenced by my time there. It’s got a Latin Pop vibe with some very cool, duet vocals, as well as Spanish guitar arrangements! Socials PLEASE:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lasanimasorchestra Instagram: 1traxband YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCASm2jLGPQk4TUleTqj9yFA TikTok: @trax_lao

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